Karl Heideck Provides A Blog To Better Explain The Philadelphia Salary History Law

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     Karl Heideck is a lawyer who also blogs. He writes blogs about how certain laws work to help Pennsylvanians better comprehend them. He has been a higher council attorney since 2015 and he graduated in 2009 from Temple University with his law degree. Prior to attending James E. Beasley School of Law Karl Heideck earned his undergraduate degree in 2003 from Swarthmore College.

One of Karl Heideck’s blog posts in depth discusses the Philadelphia Salary History Law that was implemented in January of 2017. This law was signed on January 23, 2017 by Philadelphia’s Mayor Jim Kenney. The intent of this law is to prohibit potential employers from inquiring about a potential employee’s salary history. Many times businesses will not want to pay what an employee is really worth. If an employee took a low paying job just to get by until the desired position became available often the potential employer would try to underpay that employee. Additionally, by not inquiring about previous employment wages many employers are bridging a gap between male and female wages.

Karl Heideck further explains in his blog how the law however does not only cover Philadelphia based businesses. The wording of the law can also include businesses that are not headquartered in Philadelphia but have employees in the city. Larger companies such as ComEd or Comcast were disputing this bill declaring they had a right to know about a employees previous wages and this new law was hindering their right to free speech. The Philadelphia Salary History Law also mandates that businesses that do not follow the stipulations of this law could be fined up to two thousand dollars per incident.

In April of 2016 the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce took action against the Philadelphia Salary History Law and filed an injunction. The law was supposed to go into effect in May of 2017. The Eastern District of Pennsylvania decided to stay the law due to the injunction. This appeared to be a setback for people who were hoping to bridge the salary gap. By June of 2017 the city of Philadelphia filed a motion to have the lawsuit dismissed. There was no specification on how this law could damage businesses. The district court agreed due to the fact that the original complainant could not prove how the Salary History Law would financially harm their business.

Please read details on the subject, please see http://www.phillypurge.com/2017/06/13/karl-heideck-analyzes-why-judge-wont-halt-philadelphias-new-salary-history-law/.